Why Do You Have To Wait For A Gate After Landing?

If you’ve ever been delayed after landing while the pilot announces you are “waiting for a gate to open up,” remember— it’s us on the other end of the announcement. And we’re just as frustrated as you. In fact, sometimes we can see open gates at the terminal, even as we make the announcement. We just aren’t allowed to park at them, because United’s management has no system to dynamically reroute the people and equipment needed. Most times, it doesn’t have to be this way.

A small investment would result in a dynamic gate assignment system, one which would assign landing flights to available gates, and direct ground support services to the appropriate place. The cost would be amortized in little time by the savings of on-time arrivals and downline on-time departures, not to mention fuel savings in this ultra-high-cost environment.

And in the Department of Simple Ideas, here’s one: We often take delays getting to the gate at the end of a flight because another plane is blocking our route to the gate. This could often be cured, and save time and fuel, by pushing back departing flights out of the way of the path other planes need to use to get to the gate. Pilots have to start engines and run two or three checklists after the plane is pushed back. This takes five minutes or more. If these planes are out of the way while the pilots do it, other planes can get in.  Experienced senior management would know that, or at least know enough to listen to those who do.

Tight Pilot Schedules Lead to Rampant Flight Delays

Pilot schedules built to incorporate only minimum days off leave no room for recovery when the schedules don’t fly as planned. In May, for example, some 50% of the pilots on some airplanes were assigned schedules built to minimum days off. Any burp in the system (thunderstorms for example) leaves no room for recovery since the pilot is at minimum days off and can’t fly anymore.

There is no feedback loop to the schedule builders from the actual operation. The crew scheduling group responsible for the day-to-day misconnections and cancellations for the real time operation is different than the schedule planning group. The day-to-day group knows that the lack of a pad or buffer doesn’t work, but there is no mechanism built by management to correct this, because any corrections would increase costs.

So the lack of communication and coordination increases misconnects, lowers customer satisfaction, and creates entirely predictable failures in the system. But management would rather pay these unbudgeted costs instead of increasing budgeted costs as required to do things properly. Short-term thinking, long term losses.

United’s Stock Price- Another Tilton Failure

When United exited Bankruptcy, its stock price was $40.83 a share.

On August 8th, its stock price was  $11.13 a share.

That’s a loss of 73% to shareholders. Over the same period, Continental’s share price declined 11% and Southwest’s share price dropped a mere 3%.

Instead of holding himself accountable, Glenn Tilton continues to blame external factors while creating additional wealth for himself.

It’s time for Glenn Tilton to go.